Spoon for those who shake

“Being able to take a product that was designed specifically for you into other people’s homes and learning that it changes other people’s eating habits as well, is extremely gratifying”

A new design of spoon has revolutionised the way a man with cerebral palsy can eat. Now, after receiving donations from 4 private backers, Grant Douglas and the team behind S’up Spoon are taking the product into production which they hope will transform mealtimes for more people with shaky hands by removing the frustration of foods falling off the spoon between the bowl and the user’s mouth.

Shakeless spoon

“Being able to take a product that was designed specifically for you into other people’s homes and learning that it changes other people’s eating habits as well, is extremely gratifying” says Grant, “we are extremely grateful to our donors and everyone else who has enabled us to leap from 2 prototype spoons to a situation where the spoons are now in production and available for anyone to purchase. We are very excited by the world-wide interest that this product has received. Knowing that a product you designed will enable other people to eat soup, cereals and other soft foods, is just incredible.”

Although the spoon was designed to help those with cerebral palsy, it soon became apparent to the team that it could also help people to eat who had shaky hands such as those people with other conditions – such as essential tremor or Parkinsons.

The S’up Spoon was developed in conjunction with Grant by Glasgow-based consultancy 4c Design3. The spoon head has a deeper cavity to hold contents more securely and reduce spillage. The sleek contours and matte black finishing ensure this product is in no way singled out as an assistive device; it is, perhaps, simply a new perspective on the humble spoon.

The spoon started at 4c as an intern project for Mark Penver who was soon brought onto the team full-time as the project gained traction. “Grant gave us a lot of direction working on the spoon,” says Mark. “It was important to balance the function with long-term durability and inclusivity. We wanted to create a product that allowed Grant to expand his diet, both at home and when eating out with friends.”

The spoon, priced at £15 each, is going to be launched at NAIDEX – the UK’s largest disability, rehabilitation and homecare event with over 300 exhibitors featuring the latest products and services to aid independent living – in the NEC, Birmingham, which runs from the 28th – 30th April and will also be available from sup-spoon.com from 28th April 2015.

See more about the product at HERE

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