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With the current social distancing guidelines from the government still firmly in place, the Disabled Living Foundation (DLF) is now running its ‘Trusted Assessor: Assessing for Minor Adaptations’ course online.

Although the DLF has paused all of its face-to-face training courses, it says that it recognises that there is an urgent need for staff to feel competent in assessment skills to enable discharges to happen safely and quickly. In response to this, the Foundation has made its minor adaptations course available online, ensuring people can still learn new, vital skills remotely.

According to the DLF, the new online course has seen “fantastic” demand, with the first few classes debuting last week.

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The Trusted Assessor course builds on the standards of its regular face-to-face training sessions, but uses a blended learning approach, which includes assignments, classrooms and workbooks. Learners complete e-learning based theory, watch videos, log into trainer-led webinars and complete assessments at home, all while working their way through the various modules.

Once complete, the learner will be able to assess clients for basic equipment and adaptation needs.

The ‘Trusted Assessor: Assessing for Minor Adaptations’ course is accredited at level three and is a suitable foundation for further Trusted Assessor courses, says the DLF.

Developed over 25 years ago, DLF’s Trusted Assessor courses teach people how to provide advice and carry out basic assessments for independent living equipment so that they can reach more vulnerable people, more quickly. In response to the expanding telecare sector, the DLF piloted a new telecare Trusted Assessor course in February.

To find out more about the minor adaptations course or any other equipment-related courses from the DLF, email training@dlf.org.uk or phone 0207 289 6111

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