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During this year’s Occupational Therapy Week, which runs from the 4th-10th November, the Royal College of Occupational Therapists (RCOT) has launched a new campaign to celebrate the life-changing work of occupational therapists.

The campaign – ‘Small Change, Big Impact’ – revolves round the idea that occupational therapists work with individuals to change their lives and seemingly small changes can have a powerful impact.

Throughout Occupational Therapy Week, RCOT members across the UK will be sharing their stories of Small Change, Big Impact on the College’s interactive story wall.

These stories will reflect the wide variety of roles, sectors and workplaces that OTs work in, across research, education and clinical practice, all demonstrating the value of occupational therapy.

Alongside the interactive story wall, RCOT members will also be holding events and activities across the UK to promote occupational therapy and to tell their stories to wider audiences.

Occupational Therapy Week is a national awareness week run by RCOT to promote the value of OTs and the fantastic work that they do across the UK.

However, it is not just RCOT members that can show their support for OTs during the week, anyone can get involved with the campaign by sharing the story wall on social media, or by sharing personal stories of when OTs have made a positive difference to their lives, with the hashtags #OTWeek2019 and #SmallChangeBigImpact.

Julia Scott, RCOT CEO, said: “Every day, across the UK occupational therapists change lives for the better. Occupational Therapy Week 2019 is a fantastic time to celebrate this.

“The Royal College knows very well how hard our members work and the extent of the difference they make and we want everyone else to know too. I am encouraging everyone to be loud and proud and get involved in the campaign using the hashtag #OTWeek2019.”

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